marcelo guzman

Alexis Eugene's NASA Graduate Fellowship on the Contribution of Model Aqueous Aerosol Formation from 2-Oxocarboxylic Acids to Earth’s Radiation Balance was renewed!

Alexis Eugene's (Guzman group) NASA Graduate Fellowship on "Contribution of Model Aqueous Aerosol Formation from 2-Oxocarboxylic Acids to Earth’s Radiation Balance" was renewed. Congratulations, Alexis!

 

Guzman Group Brings Drone Research Project to New Heights

Adapted from the original article by published in UKNOW

 Sean Bailey.

Guzman's Group Shows that Carboxylic Acids Behave as Superacids on the Surface of Water

Paper from the Guzman Lab among the most read American Chemical Society articles of 2017 in Physical Chemistry

Pillar and Guzman reveal how aromatic pollutants emitted during combustion and wood burning contribute to the formation of brown clouds

Aerosol particles suspended in the air of urban environments typically reduce visibility, interact with sunlight by scattering and absorbing radiation, and lower air quality. In addition, these tiny particles can also contribute large pollution plumes, called “brown clouds”, which have been observed to originate over South Asia in recent years and undergo long distance transport by the wind to reach other continents. The particles in brown clouds are composed by an unhealthy and variable mix including ozone and organic molecules found in smoke.

Undergraduate Student Honored by the Division of Environmental Chemistry of the American Chemical Society

In recognition of his contributions to the field of environmental chemistry Kayvon Ghayoumi is honored with the Division of Environmental Chemistry 2017 Undergraduate award from the American Chemical Society. Ghayoumi earned a B.A. in Chemistry at the University of Kentucky this Spring. His interest in Environmental Chemistry started while taking CHE 565 taught by Dr. Marcelo Guzman, who later became his research supervisor.

Eugene and Guzman reveal how sunlight can spark chemical reactions in clouds, fog, and mist

Atmospheric aerosols such as smoke, fog, and mist are made of fine solid or liquid particles suspended in air. In the lower atmosphere aerosols play a major role in controlling air quality, as well as in scattering and absorbing sunlight. This interaction of aerosols with light varies widely and depends on their complex chemical composition that rapidly changes under the governing highly reactive conditions found in the atmosphere. Importantly, the mysterious formation of carbon-containing atmospheric particles has intrigued atmospheric scientists during the last decade.

A collaboration of the Guzman group results in a new idea that connects the synthesis of clays and the origin of metabolism.

The question of how life has begun has fascinated scientists from many disciplines and it was the organic chemist Graham Cairns-Smith who proposed the theory for the origin of life starting from clays instead of polymers such as RNA.

 Illustration that connects the synthesis of clays and the origin of metabolism. Credit: Ruixin Zhou  Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-04-idea-synthesis-clays-metabolism.html#jCp

Alexis Eugene wins NASA Graduate Fellowship

LEXINGTON, Ky. (July 15, 2016) Alexis Eugene, a University of Kentucky doctoral student in the Department of Chemistry, has been awarded the NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowship.

Guzman’s Group article becomes the most read paper of the Journal of Physical Chemistry A

The Journal of Physical Chemistry A recognized an article by University of Kentucky Chemistry Professor Marcelo Guzman as the most read article for the last 12 months.

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