News

6/14/2018

PhD student Namal Wanninayake received an award for first place for his poster at the 2018 North American Membrane Society (NAMS) Meeting.

NAMS is a professional society that promotes membrane science and technology, ranging from fundamental studies of membrane material science to process application and development. This year NAMS conference was hosted by The University of Kentucky and King Abdullah University of Science & Technology in Lexington, KY. 

5/27/2018

This article is part of a series of articles on “UK Chemistry Alumni: Where Are They Now?”  Here we feature former undergraduate Steven Chapman, class of 2016, who is now a graduate student at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Steven's research at UW focuses on improving methodology in photocatalysis for asymmetric synthesis. Here Steven answers some questions about his current research, experiences at UK, and provides some advice for current undergraduates.

Could you tell us about your research project at the University of Wisconsin?

The focus of our lab is the development of photocatalytic methodology for asymmetric synthesis using visible light. Photochemical synthetic methods provide a complementary approach to traditional methods because the substrate’s primary reactivity occurs from its excited state rather than its ground state. My project

5/15/2018

By Olivia Ramirez

Photo Courtesy of UK Athletics | Dr. Robert Hosey with a student athlete.

When an athlete takes a hard hit or fall, one of the first things that comes to the minds of coaches, athletic trainers, team physicians and spectators is the risk of concussion. Protocols are in place to assess if an athlete has sustained a concussion or if they can be cleared to go back into the game. However, there is some ambiguity between physicians as to what constitutes a concussion.

That's why over the next three years and with a nearly $1 million grant from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, researchers at the University of Kentucky are studying whether a rapid blood test could serve as another means of support in diagnosing concussion.

5/7/2018

This article is part of a series of articles on “UK Chemistry Alumni: Where Are They Now?”  Here we feature former undergraduate Darius Allen Shariaty, class of 2016, who now works at Miltech UV International in Stevensville, MD. Allen's undergraduate research at UK focused on new binders for silicon anodes in lithium-ion batteries.  In addition to a patent application, his work recently led to a publication in Journal of the Electrochemical Society on which he is the first author. At Miltech, Allen works to develop polymer binders using UV curing methods.

(1) What made you decide to apply to UK? To accept the offer for admission?   

I enrolled at UK in the middle of a transition period of my life. At the time, I was a member of touring band, and so rather than approaching

5/7/2018

This May we celebrate and recognize the career of Professor Dennis Clouthier, who is retiring from UK after over thirty years of teaching, research, and service to our university community. While it is impossible to quantify Clouthier’s impact on academic and scientific communities, here an attempt is made to highlight some of his most notable accomplishments.  

Clouthier is well known for his pioneering work in molecular spectroscopy, using high-powered lasers to examine reactive intermediates that are particularly difficult to study. His pioneering work has led to the development of new laboratory methods, such as pyrolysis jet spectroscopy, and has significant implications for fields as diverse as understanding the fabric of the cosmos and reducing computer chip impurities.

As a teenager, Clouthier dreamed of making a career out of doing laser light shows for rock

5/6/2018

This article is part of a series of articles on “UK Chemistry Alumni: Where Are They Now?”  Here we feature former undergraduate Bryan Ingoglia who is now is a graduate student in the Department of Chemistry at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 

Brian grew up in Northern Kentucky, came to UK with the intention to obtain a degree in biology and attend medical school.  Like many undergraduate students, Brian’s interests changed as he took more advanced courses and became involved in undergraduate research. He decided to pursue graduate studies in chemistry and, near the completion of his graduate degree, he provided answers to a few questions.

(1) What made you decide to apply to UK? To accept the offer for admission?  

In high school, I received an award from UK for academic achievement; I traveled to Lexington for the ceremony and got to see

4/17/2018

By Jenny Wells and Alicia Gregory

 

Chad Risko, an assistant professor of chemistryin the University of Kentucky College of Arts and Sciences, didn’t always know there was a career to be had in doing research – until a mentor encouraged him to study chemistry as an undergraduate.

“From there, and when I went to graduate school, is where I think the research bug really took hold,” Risko said. “Being in the lab, working with people, trying to understand new ways to solve problems – that really motivated me to pursue a career in research.”

Now, as a chemistry professor and affiliated researcher in UK’s Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER), Risko says mentoring students

3/29/2018

By Dr. James Holler

Recently, the UK Chemistry community was saddened to learn of the death of Bob Guthrie, Professor Emeritus and former Chairman of the Department of Chemistry. Bob was born on June 27, 1936 in Bronxville, New York, and after his family relocated, he grew up and received his early education in New Orleans. He knew from a very early age that he wanted to achieve significant goals in his life.

Following graduation from high school, Bob matriculated at Oberlin College and was awarded a Bachelor of Science degree in 1958. While at Oberlin, he began serious study of chemistry under the tutelage of famed chemical educator J. Arthur Campbell. Bob’s next stop on the road to success was the University of Rochester, where he earned his Ph.D. in organic chemistry in 1962 with Marshall Gates, renowned for the first synthesis of morphine.

The last step in

3/28/2018

Do undergraduates make critical contributions to cutting-edge research? The answer is a decidedly yes, and not in small numbers.  Professor D. Allan Butterfield has matriculated more than 160 undergraduates in his laboratory over the 43 years he has been at UK.  Nearly all of these undergraduate researchers performed independent research under the aegis of CHE 395, “Independent Research in Chemistry.”  Approximately 60-plus refereed scientific papers have resulted from the work of these undergraduates [nearly 10 percent of Prof. Butterfield’s total publications (H-index = 96)].  This current spring 2018 semester, four CHE 395 students are in Prof. Butterfield’s laboratory.  The following is a brief synopsis of their research, their thoughts about their education at UK, and their future plans. 

       Angela Hinchie and Eric Vogt are collaborating on

3/22/2018

By Stephanie Swarts

The University of Kentucky Gaines Center for the Humanities has selected 12 exceptional undergraduates as new scholars for the university’s Gaines Fellowship Program for the 2018-19 and 2019-20 academic years. Gaines Fellowships are given in recognition of outstanding academic performance, demonstrated ability to conduct independent research, an interest in public issues, and a desire to enhance understanding of the human condition through the humanities.

Gaines Fellowships are awarded for the tenure of students’ junior and senior years; students in all disciplines and with any intended profession are given equal consideration.

UK’s 12 new Gaines Fellows are:

3/8/2018

by Susan Odom

Kentucky’s middle school girls and their parents/guardians are invited to join us for the second annual Expanding Your Horizons Conference at the University of Kentucky campus on Saturday, April 21, 2018.  This day of hands-on workshops will give middle school girls the chance to meet STEM role models and get exposure to opportunities in science, technology, engineering, and math. This is the second iteration of the conference, which is organized by members of the Colleges of Agriculture, Food, and Environment, the College of Arts & Sciences, and the College of Engineering.

Co-organizers, including Ellen Crocker (Forestry and Natural Resources) and Carmen Agouridis (Biosystems & Ag Engineering), joined forces to bring Expanding Your Horizons back to UK for a second time. The EYH team is back with more person – in particular, woman! – power than

3/7/2018

By Jenny Wells

 Chad Risko, an assistant professor of chemistryin the University of Kentucky College of Arts and Sciences and researcher at the Center for Applied Energy Research, has been selected to receive a 2018 Office of Naval Research Young Investigator Award. Risko is one of 31 academic scientists at 22 institutions to receive the honor this year.

Risko’s research is inspired by complex synthetic materials and the desire to discover fundamental connections among the

2/19/2018
most_read

There are lots of different ways to look at the reach of an article. One way to consider the influence of an article is just by looking at how many people chose to read it. To that end, the American Chemical Society has compiled lists of the five most-read chemistry articles that appeared in each ACS Publications journal in 2017, including research, reviews, perspectives and editorial pieces. These lists show a perspective on where the chemistry community allocated their attention over the past year. Among these highly read papers in the Physical Chemistry category is listed the outstanding work of Ph.D. student Alexis J. Eugene and Associate Professor Marcelo I. Guzman, "

2/15/2018

By Jenny Wells

Chad Risko, an assistant professor of chemistry in the University of Kentucky College of Arts and Sciences, has been named a 2018 Cottrell Scholar by the Research Corporation for Science Advancement. Started in 1994, Risko is the first recipient of the award at UK, a designation that recognizes top early-career scholars in chemistry, physics and astronomy.

Cottrell Scholars focus on the dual role of the teacher-scholar. Through his Cottrell award, Risko will develop a course-based undergraduate research experience (CURE) with specific focus on the application of computing and data science in chemistry. Though the concept of big data is

1/26/2018

By Jenny Wells

For the second semester, University of Kentucky’s #IAmAWomanInSTEM project has awarded scholarships to 11 UK students for project proposals that promote STEM education and careers for women.

Females are less likely than their male counterparts to pursue an education in the STEM disciplines, which include science, technology, engineering, math and health care. The #IAmAWomanInSTEM initiative, which launched at UK in 2016, seeks to change that by recruiting hundreds of female student ambassadors who are encouraging the study of STEM and health care (STEM+H) among women at UK, and empowering them to persist in those fields.

"We are very grateful for the support from the UK Women & Philanthropy as our STEM+H students are growing in their creative roles and expanding their service

1/4/2018

By Carol Lea Spence

Amelia Baylon, NRES student, helps middle-school students measure a tree during 2017 Expanding Your Horizons STEM workshop. Photo by Carol Lea Spence.

Organizers of Expanding Your Horizons invite University of Kentucky undergraduate and graduate students to apply to be workshop leaders at this year’s conference. Expanding Your Horizons is a one-day conference on April 21 for middle school girls from across Kentucky. The purpose is to expose them to and create excitement for the STEM fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics by taking part in hands-on science workshops.

Women make up only 24 percent of the STEM workforce, and women hold a disproportionately low share of STEM undergraduate degrees.

“Many times, girls lack role models in those fields, so they don’t see women in a

12/21/2017

By Dominique Page

Six University of Kentucky students took honors at the Kentucky Academy of Science (KAS) Annual Meeting held Nov. 3-4, at Murray State University. With more than 500 scientists and students in attendance, hundreds of undergraduate and graduate students from Kentucky and regional colleges and universities participated in the research competitions.

The UK students who won awards in the KAS student competitions are as follows:

Eashwar Somasundaram, a chemistry senior and Lewis Honors College student from Williamson, Kentucky, took second place in undergraduate poster presentation in the Physiology & Biochemistry category; Harrison Inocencio, computer science junior and Lewis Honors College student from Lexington, took second place in undergraduate oral presentation in the Computer & Information Sciences category
12/11/2017

By Gail Hairston

The University of Kentucky recently announced the 16 undergraduate winners of the 53rd annual Oswald Research and Creativity Competition.

Established in 1964 by former UK President John Oswald, the Oswald Research and Creativity Program encourages research and creative activities by undergraduate students at UK. The objectives of the program are to stimulate creative work by undergraduate students and to recognize individuals who demonstrate outstanding achievement.

Categories include biological sciences; design, including architecture, landscape architecture and interior design; fine arts, including film, music, photography, painting and sculpture; humanities, from creative and critical-research approaches; physical and engineering sciences; and social sciences. All submissions are sent anonymously to faculty reviewers in related

11/14/2017

Jared Delcamp never questioned where he would go to college. “Growing up in Kentucky and watching the Wildcats play makes you ready to be a part of the Big Blue Nation,” he said.

A native Kentuckian, Delcamp was born and raised in Monticello and chose to study medicine when he first came to the University of Kentucky as an undergraduate in 2000. He credits chemistry professor John Anthony with mentoring him throughout his college career, but when Delcamp first met Professor Anthony, he thought he wanted to pursue a career in medicine.

“I couldn’t decide if I wanted to do chemistry or medicine,” Delcamp said. “I thought chemistry was cool, but when you’re from a small town, if you’re smart, you’re supposed to be a doctor.”

It only took one semester for Delcamp to decide that he was passionate about chemistry. As an undergraduate, he continued to study under

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