biology

Add It Up: A Q&A with Chemistry's Mark Meier

The new College of Arts & Sciences Research Computing cluster shares the basic design elements of a modern supercomputer, though at a smaller scale and lower cost. Multiple systems are linked together within a high bandwidth, low latency framework, allowing researchers to run demanding applications across hundreds of processors simultaneously.

Chellgren Center Honors 43 New Fellows

Reputation Building

The Ecological Research and Education Center (EREC) has reached an important milestone in becoming a recognized field station.

UK Awarded $1.9 Million to Improve Retention of STEM Majors

Howard Hughes Medical Institute funds five-year project to promote student achievement in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, in collaboration with BCTC

Naff Symposium 2014: Donald E. Ingber, "From Cellular Mechanotransduction to Biologically Inspired Engineering"

 

 

40th Annual Naff Symposium chem.as.uky.edu/naff-symposium University of Kentucky College of Arts & Sciences

Dr. Donald E. Ingber Director, Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University

Abstract: The newly emerging field of Biologically Inspired Engineering centers on understanding the fundamental principles that Nature uses to build and control living systems, and on applying this knowledge to engineer biologically inspired materials and devices for medicine, industry and the environment. A central challenge in this field is to understand of how living cells and tissues are constructed so that they exhibit their incredible organic properties, including their ability to change shape, move, grow, and self-heal. These are properties we strive to mimic, but we cannot yet build manmade devices that exhibit or selectively control these behaviors. To accomplish this, we must uncover the underlying design principles that govern how cells and tissues form and function as hierarchical assemblies of nanometer scale components. In this lecture, I will review work that has begun to reveal these design principles that guide self-assembly of living 3D structures with great robustness, mechanical strength and biochemical efficiency, even though they are composed of many thousands of flexible molecular scale components. Key to this process is that the molecular frameworks of our cells, tissues and organs are stabilized using a tension-dependent architectural system, known as ‘tensegrity’, and these tensed molecular scaffolds combine mechanical load-bearing functions with solid-phase biochemical processing activities. I will describe how this structural perspective has led to new insights into the molecular basis of cellular mechanotransduction – the process by which living cells sense mechanical forces and convert them into changes in intracellular biochemistry, gene expression and thereby influence cell fate decisions during tissue and organ development. In addition, I will present how these scientific advances have been facilitated by development of new micro- and nano-technologies, including engineering of novel human organ-on-a-chip microdevices that also have great potential value as replacements for animal testing in drug development and discovery research. Understanding of these design principles that govern biological organization, and how scientific discovery and technology development can be facilitated by equally melding fundamental science and applied engineering, are critical for anyone who wants to fully harness the power of biology.

 

 

Naff Symposium 2014: Hao Yan, "Designer Architectures for Programmable Self-Assembly"

40th Annual Naff Symposium chem.as.uky.edu/naff-symposium University of Kentucky College of Arts & Sciences

Dr. Hao Yan, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry & The Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University

Abstract: The central task of nanotechnology is to control motions and organize matter with nanometer precision. To achieve this, scientists have investigated a large variety of materials including inorganic materials, organic molecules, and biological polymers as well as different methods that can be sorted into so-called “bottom-up” and “top-down” approaches. Among all of the remarkable achievements made, the success of DNA self-assembly in building programmable nanopatterns has attracted broad attention. In this talk I will present our efforts in using DNA as an information-coding polymer to program and construct DNA nano-architectures with complex geometrical features. Use of designer DNA architectures as molecular sensor, actuator and scaffolds will also be discussed.

Two UK Students Awarded Undergraduate Research Abroad Scholarships

Two UK Juniors receive Undergraduate Research Abroad Scholarship, to travel to Switzerland and Brazil.

Biology Student Slavina Goleva Awarded Summer Research Fellowship

Slavina Goleva, a sophomore Biology major from Bulgaria, was recently awarded the American Physiological Society’s Undergraduate Summer Research Fellowship for the summer of 2014.

Chellgren Center Names 37 New Fellows: 20 in A&S

The Chellgren Fellows Program is for students with exceptional academic potential and aspirations, who are eager to participate in a special learning community designed to cultivate extraordinary achievement.

Ribble Graduate Fellow Research Seminar "Two Novel Functions for Insm1 in Retinal Development"

  

Marie Forbes-Osborne is the 2012-13 recipient of the Gertrude Ribble Graduate Fellowship.  During this period, she published the results of her research project on the role of the Insm1a gene on zebrafish photoreceptor differentiation in the journal Developmental Biology.  Marie will present the current status and recent results of her continuing investigations.

Date: 
Tuesday, September 10, 2013 - 4:00pm to 5:00pm
Location: 
116 TH Morgan Bldg.
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