UK

Jeff Babbitt, Scientific Glassblower

The University of Kentucky Chemistry Department's glass shop has been run by Jeff Babbitt for almost 25 years now. Jeff does a variety of things -- from simple repairs to the construction of complicated vacuum line systems. Babbitt's job is a highly specialized one and as Jeff himself says, "a lot of people don't know about it." Here is a glimpse into the life of Scientific Glassblower, Jeff Babbitt.

Produced by the Hive, College of Arts & Sciences, University of Kentucky. as.uky.edu/chemistry as.uky.edu/glass-shop

Editor: Matthew Tarter Videographer: Tori Cincotta, John Buckman Assistant Editor: John Buckman

Arts & Sciences Hall of Fame 2014

The College of Arts and Sciences inducted six new members into its Hall of Fame Oct. 10, 2014, with a ceremony at the Singletary Center for the Arts, bringing the current totals to 38 alumni and 13 emeritus faculty A&S Hall of Fame members.

2014 Alumni Inductees:

Ethelee Davidson Baxter

Robert Straus Lipman

Jill M. Rappis

George H. Scherr

2014 Emeriti Faculty Inductees:

George C. Herring

Keith B. MacAdam

View their Hall of Fame videos here: as.uky.edu/celebrates-new-hall-fame-members

Naff Symposium 2014: Todd Yeates, "Giant Protein Cages and Assemblies in Nature and by Design"

40th Annual Naff Symposium chem.as.uky.edu/naff-symposium University of Kentucky College of Arts & Sciences

Dr. Todd Yeates, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at UCLA

Abstract: Nature has evolved myriad sophisticated structures based on the assembly of protein subunits. Many types of natural protein assemblies (such as virus capsids) have been studied extensively, while a number of equally sophisticated natural protein assemblies are only beginning to be appreciated. Among the latter group is a broad class of giant, capsid-like assemblies referred to as bacterial microcompartments. They serve as primitive metabolic organelles in many bacteria by encapsulating sequentially acting enzymes within a selectively permeable protein shell. Our laboratory has elucidated key mechanisms of these protein-based bacterial organelles through structural studies. On the engineering side, sophisticated natural protein assemblies like these have for many years represented an ultimate goal in protein design. By exploiting principles of symmetry that are shared by nearly all natural self-assembling structures, we have developed methods for engineering novel proteins that assemble to form a variety of complex, symmetric architectures. Recent successful designs include hollow protein cages composed of 12 or 24 identical subunits in cubic arrangements. Symmetric materials that extend by growth in two or three dimensions are also possible. Natural and engineered protein assemblies will be discussed, along with their future prospects for synthetic biology and biomedical applications.

Naff Symposium 2014: Donald E. Ingber, "From Cellular Mechanotransduction to Biologically Inspired Engineering"

 

 

40th Annual Naff Symposium chem.as.uky.edu/naff-symposium University of Kentucky College of Arts & Sciences

Dr. Donald E. Ingber Director, Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University

Abstract: The newly emerging field of Biologically Inspired Engineering centers on understanding the fundamental principles that Nature uses to build and control living systems, and on applying this knowledge to engineer biologically inspired materials and devices for medicine, industry and the environment. A central challenge in this field is to understand of how living cells and tissues are constructed so that they exhibit their incredible organic properties, including their ability to change shape, move, grow, and self-heal. These are properties we strive to mimic, but we cannot yet build manmade devices that exhibit or selectively control these behaviors. To accomplish this, we must uncover the underlying design principles that govern how cells and tissues form and function as hierarchical assemblies of nanometer scale components. In this lecture, I will review work that has begun to reveal these design principles that guide self-assembly of living 3D structures with great robustness, mechanical strength and biochemical efficiency, even though they are composed of many thousands of flexible molecular scale components. Key to this process is that the molecular frameworks of our cells, tissues and organs are stabilized using a tension-dependent architectural system, known as ‘tensegrity’, and these tensed molecular scaffolds combine mechanical load-bearing functions with solid-phase biochemical processing activities. I will describe how this structural perspective has led to new insights into the molecular basis of cellular mechanotransduction – the process by which living cells sense mechanical forces and convert them into changes in intracellular biochemistry, gene expression and thereby influence cell fate decisions during tissue and organ development. In addition, I will present how these scientific advances have been facilitated by development of new micro- and nano-technologies, including engineering of novel human organ-on-a-chip microdevices that also have great potential value as replacements for animal testing in drug development and discovery research. Understanding of these design principles that govern biological organization, and how scientific discovery and technology development can be facilitated by equally melding fundamental science and applied engineering, are critical for anyone who wants to fully harness the power of biology.

 

 

Naff Symposium 2014: Hao Yan, "Designer Architectures for Programmable Self-Assembly"

40th Annual Naff Symposium chem.as.uky.edu/naff-symposium University of Kentucky College of Arts & Sciences

Dr. Hao Yan, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry & The Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University

Abstract: The central task of nanotechnology is to control motions and organize matter with nanometer precision. To achieve this, scientists have investigated a large variety of materials including inorganic materials, organic molecules, and biological polymers as well as different methods that can be sorted into so-called “bottom-up” and “top-down” approaches. Among all of the remarkable achievements made, the success of DNA self-assembly in building programmable nanopatterns has attracted broad attention. In this talk I will present our efforts in using DNA as an information-coding polymer to program and construct DNA nano-architectures with complex geometrical features. Use of designer DNA architectures as molecular sensor, actuator and scaffolds will also be discussed.

More Than 5,000 Sign Up for UKs Free Online Chemistry Prep Course

The "Advanced Chemistry" course, beginning Jan. 27, will be the university's first to use Coursera, a leading platform for MOOCs (massive open online courses). The non-credit course is designed to prepare incoming and current students for college-level chemistry classes, and to provide supplemental material for students already enrolled in chemistry classes for credit.

UK Junior Biology Major Shares her Undergraduate Research Experience

Manasi Malik has just begun her junior year at the University of Kentucky, but the nineteen-year-old biology major has already been published as a lead author on a paper in a prestigious scientific journal.

View the original story on UKNow here: uknow.uky.edu/content/undergrad-researcher-has-formula-success

Light-Activated Cancer Drugs with Chemistry's Phoebe Glazer

At the University of Kentucky, Assistant Professor of Chemistry Edith "Phoebe" Glazer is looking for something more effective at killing cancer cells and less toxic to healthy cells than cisplatin. A platinum-based drug, cisplatin is one of the most commonly used cancer drugs, but leads to nausea and nerve damage. Her alternative uses ruthenium, another transition metal, to build complex molecules. Theses molecules can be "switched on" by light from a fiber-optic probe once they reach their target tumor and would kill only cancerous cells. In January 2013, Glazer received a four-year, $715,000 grant from the American Cancer Society to develop a family of ruthenium molecules to fight different kinds of cancer.

This video appears courtesy of Reveal: University of Kentucky Research Media research.uky.edu/reveal/

University of Kentucky Researchers Speak Out: Stop the Sequester

 

 

University of Kentucky physiologist Michael B. Reid, mechanical engineer Suzanne Weaver Smith, and chemist John Anthony convey the specific impact of sequestration (automatic cuts in research and other government spending) on the next generation of American scientists. These faculty investigators join academics across the country who made videos for Science Works for U.S., a website of the Association of American Universities, the Science Coalition, and the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities.

Produced by Research Communications at the University of Kentucky.

This story first appeared on UKNow, the University of Kentucky's official news source. Visit uky.edu/UKNow. A direct link to this uknow.uky.edu/content/uk-researchers-speak-out-sequester-will-squelch-scientists-training

The UK videos were produced by REVEAL (research.uky.edu/reveal), a site that offers multimedia with the stories behind the leading-edge research under way in colleges across the University of Kentucky campus.

 

 

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