The Naff Symposium

 

The Department of Chemistry at the University of Kentucky organizes an annual Symposium on Chemistry and Molecular Biology.  This Symposium was established in honor of Anna S. Naff, a University of Kentucky graduate, through the generous support of Dr. Benton Naff of NIH. The Symposium has an interdisciplinary character and is attended by students and faculty from Chemistry, Biochemistry, Biology, Pharmacy, Engineering, Agriculture and Medicine. The Symposium features renowned experts from around the world, including Nobel prize-winning scientists and is attended by faculty and students from colleges and universities in Kentucky and the contiguous States.

The Symposium will be held in the William T. Young Library on the University of Kentucky campus. A poster session will be held in conjunction with the Symposium in the Jacobs Science Building.

 

Bioelectrochemistry
and Biocatalysis

Schedule of Events - March 23, 2018

8:00 a.m. Registration & Continental Breakfast
Gallery, W.T. Young Library
8:50 a.m. Welcome - Provost Blackwell
9:00 a.m. Prof. Richard M. Crooks, University of Texas at Austin
Quantitative electrochemical detection of analytes at sub-picomolar levels using a simple paper sensor
Auditorium, W.T. Young Library
10:00 a.m. Break (refreshments available)
10:30 a.m. Prof. Shelley Minteer, University of Utah
Enzymatic Bioelectrocatalysis: From Metabolic Pathways to Metabolons
Auditorium, W.T. Young Library
11:30 a.m. Lunch & Break
1:00 p.m. Prof. James Rusling, University of Connecticut
Microfluidic arrays for protein-based cancer diagnostics and toxicity screening
Auditorium, W.T. Young Library
2:00 p.m. Prof. David Cliffel, Vanderbilt University
Electrochemically Instrumenting Organs on a Chip
Auditorium, W.T. Young Library
3:00 p.m. Poster Session Set-Up
3:30 p.m. Poster Session
Jacobs Science Building

 

Bios

Prof. Richard M. Crooks

University of Texas at Austin

Richard M. Crooks received B.S. and doctoral degrees in chemistry from the University of Illinois and The University of Texas at Austin.  His independent career has been split between Texas A&M University and UT-Austin, where he is presently holds the Welch Chair in Materials Chemistry.  His research program focuses on biosensing and electrocatalysis.

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Prof. Shelley Minteer

University of Utah

Dr. Shelley Minteer is a USTAR Professor in both the Departments of Chemistry and Materials Science and Engineering at the University of Utah. She received her PhD in Analytical Chemistry at the University of Iowa in 2000 under the direction of Professor Johna Leddy. After receiving her PhD, she spent 11 years as a faculty in the Department of Chemistry at Saint Louis University before moving to the University of Utah in 2011. She was also a Technical Editor for the Journal of the Electrochemical Society from 2013-2016 and is now an Associate Editor for the Journal of the American Chemical Society. She has published greater than 300 publications and greater than 400 presentations at national and international conferences and universities. She has won several awards including the Luigi Galvani Prize of the Bioelectrochemical Society, the Missouri Inventor of the Year, International Society of Electrochemistry Tajima Prize, Fellow of the Electrochemical Society, and the Society of Electroanalytical Chemists' Young Investigator Award. Her research research interests are focused on electrocatalysis and bioanalytical electrochemistry. She has expertise in biosensors, biofuel cells, and bioelectronics.

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Prof. James Rusling

University of Connecticut

James F. Rusling was awarded a B.Sc. in Chemistry from Drexel University in 1969, and Ph. D. from Clarkson University in 1979. He is Professor of Chemistry at University of Connecticut, and Professor of Surgery and member of the Neag Cancer Center at UConn Health Center, as well as adjunct Professor of Physical Chemistry at National Univ. of Ireland. Galway. Current research includes developing new cancer diagnostic devices for detection of biomarker proteins and peptides, low-cost 3D printed immunoarrays for point-of-care diagnostics, electrochemical and mass spectrometric arrays for toxicity screening, tumor suppressor gene damage, and fundamental bioelectrochemistry. He has authored over 400 research papers and several books, and is also a musician interested in traditional Irish and old time American folk styles.

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Prof. David Cliffel

Vanderbilt University

David E. Cliffel, Cornelius Vanderbilt Professor and Chair, Department of Chemistry, Vanderbilt University, directs an innovative research effort in instrumental design and electroanalytical methods applied to nanotechnology and biotechnology.  He is the deputy director in the Vanderbilt Institute for Integrative Biosystems Research and Education (VIIBRE), and the Technical Editor for Physical and Analytical Electrochemistry, Electrocatalysis and Photoelectrochemistry for the Journal of the Electrochemical Society.  He was a member of the Board of Directors for SEAC from 2011-2016, and is the Treasurer-elect. He received his Ph.D. in analytical chemistry from UT-Austin under the direction of Allen J. Bard in 1998, was a post-doctoral assistant with Royce W. Murray at UNC-Chapel Hill, and joined Vanderbilt University in September 2000.

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2018 Naff Committee Members:

Professor Doo-Young Kim (Chemistry, Committee Chair)
Professor Marcelo Guzman (Chemistry)
Professor Jason DeRouchey (Chemistry)
Professor Chad Risko (Chemistry)
Professor Chris Richards (Chemistry)

For more information, contact Dr. Doo-Young Kim.

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