News

10/21/2014

By Keith Hautala

(Oct. 21, 2014) — Trick or treat! The University of Kentucky is offering local children a sugar-coated chemistry lesson a full week before Halloween.

“The Sweet Side of Chemistry: Candy” is the theme of this year’s annual demonstration show, presented by the UK Department of Chemistry's graduate students at 7 p.m. Friday, Oct. 24, in Room 139 Chemistry/Physics Building. The show presents the students' favorite live chemistry demonstrations in a fun, easy-to-understand format, in celebration of National Chemistry Week, Oct. 19-25.

Families are encouraged to attend the event, which promises lots of kid appeal.  

“This event is a great way to share our enthusiasm for science with the people of Lexington” said UK Chemistry Professor Anne-Frances Miller. “They’ll come away with an understanding that chemistry is everywhere — not just in

10/17/2014

by Keith Hautala

(Oct. 17, 2014) — Research from the University of Kentucky Department of Chemistry will help batteries resist overcharging, improving the safety of electronics from cell phones to airplanes.                        

The research, led by Susan Odom’s group, has focused on the design, synthesis, and testing of organic compounds that can be incorporated into the electrolytes of lithium-ion batteries to improve their safety profiles. Specifically, Odom’s team is studying compounds called redox shuttles.

Lithium-ion batteries are the energy storage technology of choice for portable consumer electronic devices such as laptops and cell phones. Over the past few years, these batteries have been incorporated on larger scales into electric vehicles and airplanes. Battery safety

by Whitney Harder   (October 17, 2014) - A paper by John Anthony, professor in the University of Kentucky Department of Chemistry and faculty member of the Center for Applied Energy Research, has been recognized as the American Chemical Society's Editors' Choice.    Anthony's article, "Synthesis and Optical Properties of Dioxolane-Functionalized Hexacenes and Heptacenes," was recently published in the ACS publication, "Organic Letters," and was then selected to be featured in ACS Editors' Choice. The article was selected based on its importance and broad appeal across the field of chemistry. A rare honor, editors of all ACS journals are allowed to select less than 1 percent of accepted articles for this recognition.   Not only does ACS Editors' Choice recognize the most significant work in the field, but it

10/16/2014

Dr. Allan Butterfield

by Will Fawns

(Oct. 16, 2014) – The University of Kentucky's Dr. Allan Butterfield will be receiving the Society of Free Radical Biology and Medicine’s (SFRBM) Mentoring Excellence Award at the society's national conference in Seattle, Nov. 19-23.

In his 39 years at UK, Butterfield has graduated more than 65 doctoral and master's degree students and approximately 150 undergraduates. He has also trained about 20 postdoctoral scholars.

In 2012, he was selected to be a fellow of SFRBM and earned their prestigious Discovery Award for his work in the field of redox research related to Alzheimer’s disease. In 1998, he earned a trip to the White House to receive the Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics, and Engineering

10/10/2014

Ethelee Davidson Baxter

by Gail Hairston

(Oct. 10, 2014) — The University of Kentucky College of Arts and Sciences Hall of Fame induction and festivities are slated Friday, Oct. 10, at 3:30 p.m. in the Recital Hall of the UK Singletary Center for the Arts.

Honorees include:

2014 ALUMNI INDUCTEES

Ethelee Davidson Baxter

Her Honor Ethelee Davidson Baxter was born in Jackson, Kentucky, in 1939 and was raised in Lexington, Kentucky. Baxter graduated from Lafayette High School in 1957 and was inducted into the first class of the Lafayette High School Hall of Fame in 1989. She graduated from the University of Kentucky in 1961 with a bachelor's degree in English, speech and drama. While at UK, she was a Wildcat cheerleader, president of the Blue Marlins synchronized swimming team, and a member of the Kappa Alpha Theta sorority.

In 1970, Baxter and her family moved to San

10/01/2014

By Mary Venuto   Big Blue Nation reaches far past Lexington’s city limits. Across the globe, faculty and students of the College of Arts & Sciences are always seeking out new endeavors and fortifying existing relationships overseas.   Alan Fryar in the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences (EES) was awarded the prestigious Fulbright Program scholarship by the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs. Through its support of education and research, this program promotes collaboration between the U.S. and other countries to address common priorities and concerns. For his project, Fryar is working with professor Lahcen

09/30/2014

Photo c. 1915-20 of UK science lab.

by Gail Hairston 

(Sept. 30, 2014) — More than an “s” has been added since the University of Kentucky College of Arts and Science was created in 1908 with only seven faculty members. In fact there was a College of Arts and Science even before the institution was named the University of Kentucky; the institution was called the State University, Lexington, Kentucky (previously Agricultural and Mechanical College of Kentucky and State College) until 1916.

In those 106 years, several of today’s largest colleges were birthed from the original College of Arts and Science’s former programs, including today’s College of Education, College of Communication and Information, College of Social Work and College of Fine Arts.

The college grew quickly under the inspiration and commitment of President James Patterson, whose statue now graces the plaza next to the Patterson

09/11/2014

By Scott Bradley and Jon Milby   The College of Arts & Sciences is making strides in its representation of computational sciences, complementing recent faculty recruitment efforts in several departments with a new computing environment designed to meet the needs of researchers.    The scale of available computing systems has often limited computational researchers. Supercomputing environments such as those owned by UK and other national organizations have impressive resources available, but are not always a practical option for some types of research. These systems are designed to run continuously and at capacity, creating queues that may make it impractical to run smaller workloads or test new algorithms.     At the other end of the scale, individual workstations address availability issues, but are inherently limited in the

07/21/2014

Rendering of new Academic Science Building

by Kathy Johnson

(July 21, 2014) — A portion of Rose Street closes today in connection with construction of the new $112 million Academic Science Building that will transform the way students, faculty and staff learn, teach and conduct research on the University of Kentucky campus.

To move forward on this critical facility, demolition of old buildings and the ensuing construction on Rose Street will result in the need for closure of a portion of Rose Street between Huguelet Drive and Funkhouser Drive, and the section of Rose Street from Columbia Avenue to Funkhouser Drive will be restricted to local traffic only. Traffic will be detoured around the construction area using the streets of Columbia Avenue, Woodland Avenue, Hilltop Avenue, University Drive and Huguelet Drive.

Meawhile, the portion of Washington Avenue from South Limestone to Gladstone Avenue that has

07/17/2014

Stephanie Bamfo (left) conducts a chemistry experiment with her fellow STEAM Academy students at UK.

by Jenny Wells

(July 17, 2014) — Just because school is out for summer doesn't mean every student is taking a break from learning.  Many students from the Fayette County Public School's (FCPS) STEAM Academy have participated in labs and even undergraduate research at the University of Kentucky to further enhance their already innovative educational experience.

The STEAM Academy (which stands for science, technology, engineering, arts and mathematics) opened in Lexington last fall, offering its students a blended learning instructional program, focusing on mastery learning, personalized instruction and opportunities to engage in resources at UK.  The school functions under a partnership between FCPS and UK (led by the College of Education), offering dual/college credit opportunities in UK courses taught by UK faculty and "near

07/08/2014

Honors at the University of Kentucky

by Jenny Wells

(July 8, 2014) — The University of Kentucky Honors Program has selected nine incoming freshmen as recipients of the T.W. Lewis Scholarship. Representing Fayette County and a select group of Appalachian counties in Kentucky, these "Lewis Scholars" will serve as the first cohort of Honors students to receive the prestigious scholarship.

While T.W. Lewis has offered a scholarship program in his name and his mother's, Ruth Jones Lewis, since 2006, this year marks the implementation of the new Lewis Scholars program, housed in UK Honors. This January, the UK Board of Trustees accepted a pledge of $1 million from the T.W. Lewis Foundation to create and endow the fund.

"Mr. Lewis' generous endowment makes it

by Whitney Hale

(July 8, 2014) — Each year University of Kentucky students are recognized on the national, and even international, stage with a variety of prestigious scholarships, internships and fellowships that acknowledge their excellence in the classroom, as well as in research and extracurricular activities.

In the 2013-14 school year alone, UK students earned 11 more national awards than the previous year, including a prized Truman Scholarship and two Goldwaters. This brought the year's count of major honors to 35 with several national organizations awarding UK double the number of

06/19/2014

By Zachary Dodson

The Department of Chemistry and Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER) at the University of Kentucky are always looking to infuse their research environments with new energy—and recent hire Chad Risko will do just that when he comes to campus this fall.

Risko received his PhD at the Georgia Institute of Technology, where he specialized in understanding structure-property relationships of organic-based materials. He went on to Northwestern University as a research fellow where he expanded his research interests to the study of hybrid interfaces. For the past five years, he worked as a Research Scientist at Georgia Tech.

“Dr. Risko comes from the world’s leading group in applying computation and theory to the design and analysis of

06/03/2014

by Keith Hautala

(June 3, 2014) — The University of Kentucky has been awarded a $1.9 million grant to improve retention of students in the STEM disciplines: science, technology, engineering and mathematics, through a collection of initiatives dubbed "STEMCats."

UK is one of 37 research institutions selected by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) to receive an award, from among 170 institutions competing for a share of $60 million in total funding. The five-year awards, ranging from $1.2 to $2.4 million, are intended to enable schools to focus on "significant and sustained improvement in retaining students" in the STEM disciplines.

Although the need for STEM graduates is growing nationally, fewer than half of all students who enter college with the intention of majoring in aSTEM field leave with a

04/25/2014

recipients

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 25, 2014) — Two University of Kentucky juniors have received the Undergraduate Research Abroad Scholarship (UGRAS) which will support their international independent research projects during the 2014 summer session.

Tamas Nagy, a computer science and chemistry double major in the Colleges of Engineering and Arts & Sciences, and Alexis Thompson, an animal science/pre-veterinary science major in the College of Agriculture, Food and Environment, have been awarded the scholarships which support experienced

04/24/2014

Naff Symposium Banner

                                   

by Keith Hautala

(April 22, 2014) — The University of Kentucky's annual Naff Symposium hosts three leading chemistry experts on Friday, April 25, at UK's William T. Young Library auditorium. A poster session will be held in conjunction with the symposium at King Alumni House Ballroom.

Presented by the Department of Chemistry in the UK College of Arts and Sciences, the Naff Symposium brings renowned researchers, including Nobel prize-winning scientists, to campus to share their knowledge with students and faculty from UK and nearby institutions. The symposium was established in honor of Anna S. Naff, a University of Kentucky graduate, through the generous support of Dr. Benton Naff of the National Institutes of Health.

Chris Richards

by Whitney Harder

(April 23, 2014) — Chris Richards, assistant professor in the University of Kentucky Department of Chemistry, recently received a Human Frontier Science Program (HFSP) Young Investigators research grant for a research project focused on understanding complex biological processes.

Richards' project is titled “Real-time imaging of fast conformational dynamics of ion channel gating with plasmonic nano-antennas.”

Richards and his team, including Tom Vosch at the University of Copenhagen and 

04/16/2014

 

Sometimes the most obvious questions are the ones that need to be asked. In chemistry professor David Atwood’s case, that question came in 1994 when a postdoc student working in his lab realized that there was no industrial chelator that worked with mercury.

Fast forward 20 years and 50 compounds later, and Atwood is providing answers that have some far-reaching benefits.

Discoverer: David Atwood, department of chemistry, University of KentuckyDiscovery: Highly effective mercury chelatorYears in development: SixBiological application: Antioxidant, under development as a mercury poisoning therapyEnvironmental application: Under development in water filtrationSales to date: $1.5 million, as a nutritional supplement

>>Read the

04/15/2014

By Mary Venuto   (April 15, 2014) - The University of Kentucky Chemistry department is excited to welcome two new faculty members, Professors Kenneth Graham and Peter Kekenes-Huskey, to the Bluegrass this summer.    Graham specializes in carbon-based material analysis, and completed his Ph.D. under Professor John Reynolds at the University of Florida. At Florida he was part of one of the premier research groups that developed carbon-based materials for power generations and displays. He went on to Stanford University as a research fellow where he sharpened his expertise in the fields of organic light-emitting diodes and organic solar cells.    “He will bring with him a very broad analytical/characterization skill-set and an interest in the study of interfaces that are present in devices, particularly those in photovoltaic devices,” said University of Kentucky Chemistry Department Chair

04/14/2014

by Gail Hairston 

(April 14, 2014) — University of Kentucky President Eli Capilouto, as the principal investigator, will lead a multi-million-dollar initiative with Kentucky and West Virginia universities to increase underrepresented undergraduates studying in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM).

The five-year, $2.5 million National Science Foundation (NSF) grant establishes the Kentucky-West Virginia Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation (KY-WV LSAMP) in the STEM disciplines. Coordinated by the UK Office for Institutional Diversity and UK’s co-PI and engineering Associate Professor Johné Parker, the alliance of nine institutions of higher learning includes UK, University of Louisville, West Virginia University, Western Kentucky University, Centre College, Marshall University, Kentucky State University, West Virginia State

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