Featured Stories

Incoming UK Freshman Makes Big Impression

UK chemistry professor Susan Odom's student, Corrine “Nina” Elliott, attended the 244th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society in Philadelphia as an 18-year-old high school student planning to attend UK in the fall.

Research Rewarded: Marcelo Guzman

Chemistry Professor Marcelo Guzman was recently awarded a five year National Science Foundation (NSF) career grant to aid in his atmospheric chemistry research with students here at the University of Kentucky.

The grant will also enable Guzman to extend the reach of the university and chemistry department by strengthening and creating new connections with other institutions such as local high schools.

In this podcast, Professor Guzman discusses how the grant will be used, some potential applications for the research he’ll be conducting, and the joy he finds working with students in the laboratory.

 

This podcast was produced by Patrick O'Dowd.

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Russia Courses

Explore Russia’s modern wars through literature, film, and history. Learn about Tolstoy’s idea of nonviolence and then examine Russian and Soviet experiences in World War I, the Russian Civil War, and World War II. Analyze how memories of these wars shape the present day. This course is being offered in conjunction with the College of Arts and Sciences Passport to the World Program: Re-imagining Russia’s Realms: Peoples, Arts, Cultures, and Homelands of Eurasia.

Biology Graduate Student Awards & Accomplishments

 

Kudos to our graduate students for their many successes!


Spring 2017

Fellowships

Light-Activated Cancer Drugs with Chemistry's Phoebe Glazer

At the University of Kentucky, Assistant Professor of Chemistry Edith "Phoebe" Glazer is looking for something more effective at killing cancer cells and less toxic to healthy cells than cisplatin. A platinum-based drug, cisplatin is one of the most commonly used cancer drugs, but leads to nausea and nerve damage. Her alternative uses ruthenium, another transition metal, to build complex molecules. Theses molecules can be "switched on" by light from a fiber-optic probe once they reach their target tumor and would kill only cancerous cells. In January 2013, Glazer received a four-year, $715,000 grant from the American Cancer Society to develop a family of ruthenium molecules to fight different kinds of cancer.

This video appears courtesy of Reveal: University of Kentucky Research Media research.uky.edu/reveal/

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